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Deep trouble in underwater archaeology

I am an underwater archaeologist who owns a Swiss Army knife since his boyhood scouting days. Several years ago, I settled with a Workchamp, a tool that goes with me everywhere I go - even underwater – a tool that ultimately saved my life twice in the same day.

Several years ago, while being the excavation director of the wreck site of a Spanish galleon sunk in the Azores Islands in the late 16th century, I was coordinating the raising of a bronze gun from 40 meters deep. On a perfect example of the Swiss Cheese model of accident causation, all things that weren’t supposed to go wrong, did go wrong: due to a free flow regulator, too much air was sent into one of the lifting bags; this caused an imbalance on the rising gun, which caused it to slide within the lifting cradle; this, in turn, caused of one of our divers to get entangled on the cables. I reached out for him but that whole jumble of bags, cables and divers then started to ascend out of control. I immediately reached for my WorkChamp and frantically managed to cut us loose at around 30 meters, thus saving ourselves from a serious, maybe fatal, decompression hit.

When we surfaced, we found out that the out of control ascending gun had knocked out our overboard engine out of its sockets, badly damaging the fuel line and the propeller. I then spent about 2 hours using my WorkChamp to unscrew, repair and screw back on the overboard engine, thus preventing us from going adrift into deeper waters in the middle of the Ocean.

The beauty of it all is that my WorkChamp, despite spending hours in salt water, still works like a charm.

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